Craig Alter, MD
Disclosures: I/we have no financial relationships to report.

Craig Alter, MD, is a Pediatric Endocrinologist and Director of the Pituitary Center in the Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

Areas of Expertise: Pituitary Disorders, Neuroendocrinology, Tumors of the hypothalamus/pituitary/pineal region. CNS Hamartoma, Germinoma, Craniopharyngioma, Rathke Cleft cyst, Kallmann Syndrome.  Post-cancer endocrinopathy. Diabetes, Growth disorders, Thyroid disease and abnormal puberty.
Locations: Main Campus; Specialty Care & Surgery Center, Bucks County; Specialty Care & Surgery Center, King of Prussia, S. Goddard Blvd.; Specialty Care, Abington

View Craig Alter's Bio

 

 

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Harvard Med School is in Boston

 

Board Certification:  Pediatric Endocrinology (not General Peds anymore)

 

Titles:

 

              Professor of Clinical Pediatrics

             

 

BACKGROUND:

 

Craig A. Alter, M.D. is Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Director, Neuroendocrinology Center.  He received the Thomas Moshang Jr Endowed Chair of Pediatrics in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.  He was been elected as a Director of the Pediatric Endocrine Society.  He was named "Master Clinician" at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Alter was the recipient of the 2011 University of Pennsylvania Dean's Award for Excellence in Teaching

 

Dr. Alter completed his undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania where he graduated summa cum laude with majors in Mathematics, Chemistry, and a minor in French.  He attended Harvard Medication School in a joint program with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where he graduated with honors.  He completed his residency at Harvard’s Boston Children’s Hospital before his fellowship in Pediatric Endocrinology at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.  As a fellow, he was awarded Fellow Teacher of the Year.

 

Following his fellowship, he joined the faculty of the University of Massachusetts where was awarded the Faculty Teaching Award and where he developed the Diabetes Center for Children.  In 1999, Dr. Alter returned to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and developed the satellite and outreach programs in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.  After serving as Medical Director of the Clara Barton Diabetes Camp, he founded Philadelphia’s only diabetes camp (Camp Freedom) in 2001. 

Dr. Alter’s clinical and research focus is on Neuroendocrinology where he serves as Director of the Pituitary Center.  He continues to lecture nationally on disorders of the pituitary gland and diabetes insipidus. 

 

Dr. Alter’s interests included diabetes insipidus, disorders of the pituitary, panhypopituitarism, prolactinoma, pituitary tumors, growth disorders, disorders of puberty, gynecomastia, Turner Syndrome, and thyroid disorders.   In his role as Director of the Pituitary Center, he works closely with Neurosurgery, Neuro-oncology, and NeuroradiologyDr. Alter is a renowned speaker in pediatric endocrinology at national and international pediatric endocrinology conferences.  He also has written several “Medical Mystery” columns in the Philadelphia Inquirer. 

 

 

 

 

 

Pituitary Center terms

 

 

Craniopharyngioma A craniopharyngioma is a noncancerous (benign) tumor that develops at the base of the brain near the pituitary gland. ... Craniopharyngioma causes symptoms by: ... Damage to the pituitary gland causes hormone imbalances that can lead to excessive thirst and urination, and slow growth.

 

Pituitary Cysts 

 

Hamartoma

 

Post-radiation effects

 

Diabetes Insipidus

 

Histiocytosis

 

Hypophysitis or lymphocytic hypophysitis is inflammation of the pituitary gland.  It can present with a deficiency of some of the pituitary hormones. 

 

Arachnoid Cysts

 

Prolactinoma

 

Gigantism/Acromegaly

 

Rathke’s  cleft cyst   A Rathke's cleft cyst is a benign growth found on the pituitary gland in the brain, specifically a fluid-filled cyst in the posterior portion of the anterior pituitary gland.

 

 

Empty sella syndrome